Jeroen Bekkers
reports on Groove

Wednesday, April 24, 2002

KAGroove discusses Groove's competition in the official Forums

Our competition is the current/traditional means of collaboration, which is a centralized approach.

Collaboration is largely asymmetric: functional needs and membership change on a day-by-day basis. People swarm around a process, practice, opportunity, or issue, assemble tools, pulse, and disband. Our customers have told us that web-based collaborative technologies havenít delivered on the promise of "working the way that people work", for a number of reasons, each of which lends credence to the need for decentralized smart clients. Consider:

1) People want to work on the plane at 30,000ft, but also outside of the office in hotels, at home, or at customer sites. Groove allows connected or disconnected access to collaborative shared spaces. All data in Grooveís secure shared spaces persist, meaning I can access them anywhere-anytime, with or without network connectivity.

2) People donít always assemble in real-time: Grooveís real-time features (synchronous) will deliver a positive impact on travel costs, but the real benefit is that the Groove platform also supports different-time (asynchronous) collaboration. For companies trying to attack the challenges that geographic and time-dispersion create, Groove delivers both modes of collaboration in a single package.

3) People donít use the same tools each time they embark on a collaborative activity: Because web services are centralized, a vendor must deliver a common denominator set of functionality which ultimately forces everyone to work within that framework. Unfortunately, collaborative activities are amorphous, largely unstructured, and change every time they are executed. Groove was built from the ground up to facilitate just-in-time, adaptive, collaborative activities and communications.

4) Resilience and availability: Decentralized services have no single point of failure. Groove clients synchronize in the background automatically and without user intervention. If one client is destroyed, others can reinvite the new device. If Relay goes down, Groove clients will "fetch" messages that were lost on the Relay Service from the other peers.

5) Scalability: Groove was built to scale to the size of the internet, not a server farm.

  


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Last update: 2/19/2003; 4:25:04 PM.